Deadline: 20th October, 2017

 

The New Plastics Economy is an ambitious, three-year initiative to build momentum towards a plastics system that works. Applying the principles of the circular economy, it brings together key stakeholders to rethink and redesign the future of plastics, starting with packaging. The initiative is led by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation in collaboration with a broad group of leading companies, cities, philanthropists, policymakers, academics, students, NGOs, and citizens.

 

It is a call for designers, scientists, entrepreneurs, and academics to create a plastics system that works. You can enter for either of the following:

$1 million circular material challenege: winners will receive $200,000 and exclusive access to a 12-month acceleration programme, with the opportunity to receive mentoring and support from New Plastics Economy participant organisations, to advance their innovations and demonstrate that their materials have the potential to be a viable alternative to non-recyclable multi-material laminated packaging.

$1 million circular design challenege: The Circular Design Challenge seeks to catalyse innovation and help to advance the development of new packaging formats and/or delivery models that can be alternatives to the ones used today. The Challenge targets small-format items – which make up 10% of all plastic packaging – and include things like sauce and shampoo sachets, wrappers and tear-offs, straws, take-away coffee cup lids and bottle caps. These items generally don’t get recycled, either because they are so light and small they get filtered out in automated sorting processes, or because they are not worth the effort to be collected and sorted manually.

For more information and application, click Here


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